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Blog

To be, or not to be

Posted on August 8, 2015 at 10:00 PM

Part of my being an academician is the duty to present research papers in conferences, locally or abroad. It can be tiring, at times, especially when you are in the early stages of doing research. I wouldn't be true to myself, however, if I say that I don't look forward to it either. Of course I do. I do because presenting papers in conferences also means getting the chance to (1) meet and network with other academics from other universities and (2) visit other places.

True to my being an educator, I bring back home and incorporate into my lessons whatever it is that I find worthy of sharing with my students. My travel to the UK, for instance, was one of my favorite trips not only because the conference venue was in London, but also because I took from it both memories and teaching tools I was able to and will continue to use in my literature class. I'll show in my next post my loots from this visit. I went to a number of "literary" places such as William Shakespeare's Globe theatre, the Westminster Abbey and the West End. 

I teach Drama, so visiting Globe, in particular, gave me a high. In my class, for instance, I used the photos I took to discuss the history of English drama, William Shakespeare and his plays, and a whole lot more. 

As I'll be sharing quite a number of photos, I'll divide this blog article into two, with the first highlighting the museum. In my next article, I'll walk you through inside Globe theatre itself.  


On the walls leading to the entrance of the Globe/ museum, you will see huge dominantly white boards that timeline William Shakespeare's life. Naturally, the timeline starts with his birth in 1564, followed by major events during his lifetime, such as 1575, when St. Paul's theatre opened; 1580, when Sir Francis Drake completed his voyage around the world, and; 1585, when Sir Walter Raleigh colonized Virginia.

This shows 1590, the time when boy theatre companies were suppressed, followed by the opening of the Swan theatre in 1595.


In 1599, Globe opened in Southwark (where it stands today), but it was burned down in 1613, 14 years after. I'll show and discuss the reason why/ how it caught fire, BUT you've got to wait for it in my next post. :D

Shakespeare died in 1616 and seven years after, his First Folio of plays was published. Twenty-one years later, Globe was demolished. It took 353 years for the Globe, that stands now, to be built again in 1997. 

Past the timeline, you will see a brickwall almost covered by posters featuring the different plays staged in the theatre and a couple or so encased in glass such as the one above.

Shakespeare's bust welcomes you at the entrance.



I came to the theatre/ museum a few minutes ahead of the next tour, so I had the chance to enjoy viewing quite a number of things Elizabethan, such as the dioramas below.




A few Elizabethan costumes, props and stage fixtures were on exhibit as well such as the one above (based on the portrait of Elizabeth I around late 16th century) and the others below.


"Cleopatra" was currently staged when I visited. I'll talk a teeny bit about this in my next post when we tour together the Globe theatre.


This full costume was used by the Nurse in Shakespeare's "Romeo & Juliet" 2004 production, as shown in  the photo below.

 

A photo of a scene from the 2004 production of "Romeo and Juliet."

Nope, I'm not part of the display (although I wouldn't mind donning that beautiful gown of Elizabeth I), but behind me was the entire exhibition for the theatre season plus other permanent exhibits below.



As soon as I got myself up to this point, our tour guide was already calling us, so I'll cut my article here. Catch my next post as I'll be walking you through Globe theatre itself. See you!  

Categories: Conferences, Literature, Travels

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